site map • about • contact • links • privacy policy. The triad is the basic building block for many different types of chords. Only one note different from a major scale (it has a b3 interval), the melodic minor scale is effective when soloing over tonic minor chords, such as the Im7 chord in a minor blues progression. Use the iRealPro Minor Blues backing track to practice these voicings in tempo. The C7-B7 sequence creates an interesting movement into the final Em chord. In the minor scale and minor chord progression, the second one is always diminished. This distinctive chord progression descending by half steps is what differentiates the minor blues progression. One possible fingering for F#dim7 is XX7878. In the C minor blues progression, we have an Ab7 in bar 9, leading to a G7 in bar 10, which resolves back to the tonic for the final 4 bars. Here you will learn many 12 bar blues progressions, from the most basic ones to more complex. The first mode that you will explore in this lesson outside of the minor blues scale is the melodic minor scale. In the C minor blues progression, we have an Ab7 in bar 9, leading to a G7 in bar 10, which resolves back to the tonic for the final 4 bars. So this progression will be in the key of A minor like this Am – B⁰ – E – Am Furthermore, you can try this progression using any other key. The turnaround could consist of chords or a lick. Check out the course on Jazz Piano Foundations if this material is new to you. Here is an alteration of the progression above with an extra chord that makes the progression some more complex. In it’s most basic form, it contains just the I, the IV and the V chords of the given key. Below is an example of a proto typical progression in the key of Am followed by several common variations. There is one more kind of jazz blues you should know. Suggestions with short notation: XX322X (C9), XX123X (F13), XX345X (G13) and XX436X (G7#9). Minor Blues Progressions (i-iv-i-v-i) The 12-bar minor blues progression is similar to a 12-bar traditional blues progression except that the minor tonality is used in place of the major. A seventh chord is a triad which has been extended to include the 7th degree of the scale. Normally, the E chord progression starts with an E chord and I jam along trying techniques from famous blues men, and also surprising myself with completely new sounds! An Easy Blues Progression In the Key of E Go to next article in the course: Give your chords more blues feeling The C#9 chord with short notation: X4344X (use the same shape for C9 and B9). This form of the minor blues progression uses 4 chords: the i chord, the iv chord, the v chord, and the V chord. The last 4 bars of the minor blues progression is somewhat different to the standard 12 bar blues form. In the twelfth bar E7 are played for one beat and when B7 the remaining three beats. Next extend the triads to include the 7th degree of the chord. The C7-B7 sequence can also be utilized as a turnaround. These tables present the 12 bar structure in 12 bars that you read from measure 1 to measure 12 and with typically four beats per bar: This is one of the most common progressions. 8 bar blues progressions Standard 8 Bar Blues in E. This is one of the most standard progressions of 8 bar blues. You could also try to play E before switching to E7 and the same concerning A and A7. All Rights Reserved. Notice also that the iv is played in the second bar, not mandatory though. The 12 bar blues is the most common blues chord progression. This is one of the most standard progressions of 24 bar blues. 1 shows its basic form. Here is the interval pattern for the melodic minor scale. Using an altered chord gives a different color. Leave us your email below and we will send you a full sample lesson and a PDF download. by Tommaso Zillio. So far we have only used three chords, but here is a fourth chord (ii7) is added in the ninth bar. This is one way to play a 16 bar blues, by simply extend the first section. UK & Europe: +44 808 196 2012 The turnaround at the end now has a VI chord added in bar 11. The same progression in A minor: The Bm7b5 chord with short notation: x2323X. First, is the type of chords used in each of these progressions. Bird Blues. This adds some nice voice leading into the ii chord. Blues if often played with a 12 bar structure, a so-called 12 Bar Blues. The i, iv, and v chords will all be minor 7th chords, and are therefore indicated by lower case roman numerals. A turnaround progression is any series of chords that takes the listener from one chord, Cm7 in this case, and turning it around back to itself using a series of chords, Dm7b5-G7alt in this case. A variant is to play the V chord also in the 14th bar. These four chords (Im7-bIIImaj7-IIm7b5-V7), are one of the most common minor key turnarounds found within the jazz idiom. The last 4 bars of the minor blues progression is somewhat different to the standard 12 bar blues form. Minor Blues Progression 5 Now we will add a bIIImaj7 chord in between the I and II chords in bars 1 and 12. FIGURE 1 presents a very basic E minor jazz-blues progression, stripped down to triadic barre chords—no sevenths or other chord tones beyond the root, third and fifth. This is a variation of the previous 12 Bar structure, but with an extended, chromatic sequence. The Melodic Minor Scale. This is the same as above, but in another key. The V chord will be a dominant 7th chord, which is the same type of chord used for all the chords in the major blues progression. No new chords are added. This creates a fuller sound than simple 3-note triads. The E7(#9) chord with short notation: X7678X. Countless songs—in many styles—are based on this structure. 12-Bar Blues. Download theory supplements, midi files, chord changes and full note-for-note transcriptions of every lesson. It isn't necessary to play E as a dominant chord, it is also possible to play regularly E majors. It’s called a Bird Blues. This is one of the most standard progressions of 8 bar blues. As it's name would suggest, it is made up of 12 bars (or measures), which are laid out in a very specific order: The progression uses the I, IV and V chords of the major scale. Notice also the D9 in the 10th bar. The fundamental chord progression is E, E7, A, A7 and B7. This common chord progression is associated with the classic love songs and do-wop tunes of the 50s, but it shows up all over music history. This means that if you know the root note or chord, you can construct the rest of the 12 bar blues progression as well. These chords help to add harmonic diversity to the first three bars of the minor blues, which are normally just a long Cm7 chord. The purpose of this lesson is to introduce the minor blues form and explore the differences to the standard 12 bar form. The key of the the chord progression will determine exactly …